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of newtown, connecticut. the people of connecticut can relate to these victims of the assault and all americans can relate to some extent this crime that's occurred. at this elementary school. madam speaker, i have four kids and 10 grandkids, three of my daughters are teachers by profession. my wife is a first grade elementary school teacher. and no parent, no parent ever wants to bury their child. they just don't want to do that. we never want our children to die in their youth. like these children did. so, madam speaker, we mourn with the families of connecticut. we must honor the victims in our prayers and in our words and ask the good lord to bless them, their families, the people of connecticut and yes, our country. and that's just the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: the mall shooting that might have been worse and ended in newtown, connecticut, where it's impossible to imagine that it was worse. it's part of an ongoing pattern of c
of connecticut to be united states district judge. the presiding officer: the senator from vermont is recognized. mr. leahy: madam president, the senate is finally being allowed to vote today on the nomination of michael shea to be a district judge in the united states district court for district -- the district of connecticut. it has taken a long time for this day to come but he will be confirmed, and i congratulate him and his family on his confirmation and i congratulate the two senators from connecticut for finally having this come to a vote. i mention this not to urge that we confirm him because we will and i will very proudly vote for him, but michael shea is another nominee whose nomination was stalled for months for no good reason. the judiciary committee and the distinguished presiding officer serves on that committee will call we gave his nomination strong bipartisan support, more than seven months ago. he has the support of both home state senators, both senator lieberman and senator blumenthal. he has significant litigation experience. he is a graduate of yale law school. he clerked
of the civilian pension connecticut affect medicaid and lots of other programs like that and the budget cut likes the idea because it saves money. it doesn't save that much at first but it saves a lot of money over time and i guess a little for to entered the league in the first ten years and more after that the savings continue to grow and grow. advocates for older americans don't like this idea very much at all because the savings are so big that means they are getting less money each month and in their benefits each year. >> so there's the question of what it means for the retirees beneficiary right now in the next couple of years and the on going into the future and then the president sending the measure of what would mean across the government. what do democrats think of this? you mentioned might be amenable to it but what about the house democrats, where do they stand? >> you had congressman larsen on here and you heard what he said not including social security and peace talks. that is a common belief of opinion among the democrats on the hill and in both the senate and house of would be a
shooter at sandy hook elementary school in you intown, connecticut. it's heartbreaking to listen to the stories of innocent lives cut cruelly short. the pain and grief of the families and friends of these students and teachers are unimaginable. i just want to echo some of the comments that senator durbin made and senator leahy made. we know that the teachers and the aides put their life on the line in order to try to save children. the unbelievable task of the first responders coming to the scene, not knowing what they would find, we send our prayers to all. this is a tragedy beyond words, and i think president obama said it best last night that our hearts are broken. but as senator durbin has said and senator leahy, i particularly want to thank you, we need to take action. congress needs to come together and take action to protect the safety of our children. we must do better. there have been too many episodes in which children's lives and others have been lost that we must figure out ways to do things, to act to prevent these types of tragedies. this conversation must include a
in the connecticut state senate where he served for ten years, including six as the majority leader of the connecticut state legislature. after returning to private practice for two years, he served as the first full-time connecticut attorney general. it was during his years as attorney general that he met the love of his life, hadassah. today they have 4 children and 12 grandchildren. then in 1988, again he took on one of the giants of politics in the state of connecticut, a race that no one thought he could win, but he did. he defeated an incumbent united states senator. and for the last 24 years he served the people of connecticut and this country with honor and distinction. i was also pleased to have the opportunity to support senator lieberman's historic candidacy for vice president in 2000. joe was the first major jewish party candidate for vice president. senator lieberman is a devout observant jew. he's written a book about the importance of keeping the sabbath as a day of rest. i read the book. i was so impressed with that book. our sabbaths may be on different days, but th
senate, the attorney general of the state of connecticut, elected to the united states senate four times, a vice-presidential nominee in the year 2000, a candidate for president, and i should probably add nearly a nominee for vice president again. that he managed to achieve such prominence while being the least partisan politician i know is a credit to his character and to the exemplary quality of his public service and to the public's too often frustrated desire for leaders who seek office to do something, not just to be someone. he has been a tireless advocate for the rights of the oppressed, the misfortuneate, the disenfranchised. tireless, too, in his concern for the security of the united states, for the strength of our alliances, the excellence of our armed forces and the general progress of our values. he came here to do justice, to love mercy and to walk humbly with his god. it's hard to find anyone here who doesn't like and admire joe. he's impossible to dislike, even if you only know him a little. most of his detractors seem to be people who don't know him and who tend to view
, that hit new jersey, that hit connecticut, that hit delaware, that hit maryland. we now see that our infrastructure has to be what we call hardened, made stronger. we can do that if we invest in our people. so, madam president, the president has offered a very clear plan that takes us off the fiscal cliff that is fair. we have 27 days to do the right thing. the senate already passed the tax cuts for 98% of the people. all we're asking is for the house to do that, match us. then we can get back to the table and figure out a way to soften the blow of the automatic spending cuts. we could look at tax reform. and i want to just say this about tack reform. when our colleagues complain about tax rates and say well, we would rather close loopholes, watch out. in order to raise the kind of funds we need to raise to lower this deficit, you're looking at the two biggest --quote, unquote -- deductions. one is for your mortgage and one is for charitable, and i would ask rhetorically what billionaire do you know who has a mortgage? i don't frankly know any. they own their own holes. they don't ne
like a small town that's through the magic of federalism and the connecticut compromise and the continental congress, a state with two senators. one of the things i'm proudest of about our state -- senator carper knows this well -- is a tradition that just celebrated its 200th anniversary, the epitome of what we call the delaware way. it's a tradition that happens two days after every election. it's called return day, and it happens in georgetown, which is the county seat of our southern most county, sussex county. what happens two days after the election, the first thing that happens is we gather out at a farm and two by two, the candidates who ran against each other in the general election get into horse-drawn carriages and ride slowly down the main streets of georgetown where crowds of thousands come out to see the candidates who just days before were engaged in vigorous political combat being polite, being friendly and waving to the crowds. what happens after that, senator carper? mr. carper: we have this beautiful center of town in george, beautiful old brick buildi
, the gentleman from connecticut, longstanding authority on the subject of election reform in terms of the role of money in campaigns -- honoring the vows of our founders for a government of the many, not the government of the money and a person who has commanded the respect of our colleagues, has worked with aggressive organizations, brings real authority to the stuff, congressman john larson, chair of our taskforce. >> thank you, madam leader, and i thank you for the opportunity to serve our caucus in an area that is critical to all americans. we are just through major presidential and congressional elections. it is clear from listening to our colleagues and from listening to the people out there in this country that it is long overdue that we refer to as d.a.r.e., which, disclose, amend, reform, enforce, empower, and have reform for election in a way that will make sure that every american has access to the polls and that anyone who seeks to run for public office has the ability and financing to do so and that we can limit the amount of money that has so overshadowed our process. to those en
ordered. for what purpose does the gentleman from connecticut seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, by the direction of the democratic caucus i offer a privileged resolution and ask for its immediate considering. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. caller: house resolution 830, resolution designating the ranking of a certain named member a certain standing demofe house of representatives resolved that mr. michaud shall rank above ms. brown of florida on the committee on veterans affairs. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the resolution is adopted. without objection, a motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, proceedings will resume on questions previously postponed. votes will be taken in the following order, ordering the previous question on house resolution 827. adopting house resolution 827 if ordered and suspending the rules and passing h.r. 6190. the first electronic vote will be conducted as a 15-minute vote. the remaining electronic votes will be conducted as five-minute votes. the unfinished business
the wealthy but everyone. what it means, frankly, is whether you live in connecticut like the presiding officer or illinois like myself, every family is going to see several things happen automatically. taxes will go up. the payroll tax cut that has helped this economy is going to disappear. unemployment benefits are going to disappear for millions of americans who are searching for work, and many other changes will take place, none of which will be favorable in terms of an economic recovery. i think that we ought to stop and reflect for a moment here on lessons learned. here's what i have learned. if we're going to solve this problem, we need to do two things. we need to be prepared on both sides of the table to give, and that's a hard thing for many people to acknowledge, but we do. we have to be willing to give on both sides of the table. i remember senator reid receiving a letter after the super committee was hard at work coming up with a bipartisan proposal, signed by virtually every senator on the other side of the aisle, said do not include a penny of revenue. that was the end of
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11